Teaching

Craig Allen  CRAIG ALLEN

Natural Resources (NRES) 896, Ecology of Biological Invasions

Biological invasions are an accelerating global phenomenon with potential far-reaching economic and ecological impacts. This course is intended to increase students' understanding of invasions and their impacts. It draws from plant, invertebrate and vertebrate examples. The focus is primarily upon animal invasions and understanding the effects on structure, process and function of native and ecological systems. Towards the latter part of the semester, time is devoted to developing and testing hypotheses related to invasions. Some areas covered include which species invade, which communities are invaded, invasion processes, control and management, invasions and extinctions, impacts on native species, impacts on ecosystems, economic impacts, global comparisons, community and ecosystem assembly. A class manuscript, with all students as coauthors, is expected.

Spring 2006, Spring 2008, Spring 2010

Natural Resources (NRES) 896, Landscape Ecology

The focus of this course is the investigation of spatial heterogeneity and pattern: how to characterize patterns, how they develop and change through time, and its implications for populations, communities, and ecosystem processes. We will explore both theoretical and applied aspects of landscape ecology. Additionally, students will develop and complete a project focusing on some aspect of landscape ecology and employing methods of spatial analysis. Upon completion of this course, students will have knowledge of a number of prominent issues in landscape ecology.

Spring 2007, Spring 2015

Natural Resources (NRES) 898, Foundations of Ecological Resilience

This new course develops an understanding of the concept of resilience, especially ecological resilience. Students will explore both theoretical and applied aspects of ecological resilience, and the development of resilience theory. To further explore these concepts, students will develop and complete a group project focusing on a resilience appraisal of a system of people and nature in Nebraska. At the conclusion of the course, students will have knowledge of a number of prominent issues in resilience theory, its development and application.

Spring 2009, Spring 2011, Spring 2013, Spring 2017

Joseph Fontaine  JOSEPH (TJ) FONTAINE

Natural Resources (NRES) 898, Adaptive Natural Resource Management

From cultural taboos to the current socio-ecological framework, the art and science of natural resource management has and continues to evolve. The primary focus of this course is to introduce students to the concepts of structured decision making and adaptive management, but in doing so the course will explore the history of natural resource management and the various management paradigms that have and continue to dominate resource management. At the completion of this course students will have an understanding of the theory and practice of adaptive management as well as an understanding of why we continue to move toward a more transparent and scientific methodology of natural resource management.

Fall 2010, Spring 2013

Kevin Pope  KEVIN POPE

Natural Resources (NRES) 871, Quantitative Fish Techniques

This course provides information necessary to address scientific and management questions. It is designed to increase students' understanding of current fishery assessment practices. Emphasis is placed on quantitative assessments of populations (e.g., recruitment, growth, and mortality), communities (predator-prey interactions) and ecosystems (biostressors). At the completion of this course, students should be able to apply current quantitative methods used in fishery data analysis, effectively communicate statistical ideas, and critique scientific studies in particular, be able to identify strengths and weaknesses of statistical assessments.

Spring 2008, Spring 2010, Spring 2012, Spring 2014, Spring 2016

Natural Resources (NRES) 965, Managed Aquatic Systems
(team-taught with Mark Pegg, UNL)

Anthropogenic disturbances are common place in inland waters of developed and developing countries. This course is designed to increase students' understanding of ecological processes that occur in regulated river basins and associated problems or opportunities that arise with fishery management. The focus is primarily on fishes and understanding how structure, process and function of aquatic systems are influenced by human activities. Topics covered include continuum concept, Thorton's reservoir continuum model, nutrient cycling, population dynamics, biotic interactions and river-reservoir interfaces. A unique aspect of this course is the presence of both professors in the classroom; that is, this course is truly team-taught, providing students the formal opportunity to interact with two faculty members that have differing experiences and sometimes differing opinions.

Spring 2007, Spring 2009, Spring 2011, Spring 2013, Spring 2015, Spring 2017

Cooperators